koulin
Wherever perfectionism is driving, shame is riding shotgun. Perfectionism is not about healthy striving, which you see all the time in successful leaders, it’s not about trying to set goals and being the best we can be, perfectionism is basically a cognitive behavioral process that says if I look perfect, work perfect, and do everything perfectly, I can avoid shame, ridicule, and criticism. It’s a defense mechanism.

"Why Doing Awesome Work Means Making Yourself Vulnerable"

So, I’ve been waiting for someone to explain this extremely simple concept to me my entire life.

(via kelsium)

kimothyrich asked:

I enjoyed scrolling threw your tumblr very much. All your posts in Europe, especially the Harry Potter related stuff. I learned a few things as well. Thanks, ill finish scrolling later. :) haha

Wonderful! I’m so glad you enjoyed looking through this blog! Thank you for your time! I’m very happy that there are people like you who can take something positive away from this blog! Makes it feel worthwhile :) 

yeahboywithoutdollface asked:

Hiiii there! I just saw your post about seeing jude law in Henry V and i am flying over to london to see the play in january, any tips on meeting him? :)

How exciting! You’re going to have a wonderful time! After the show, when you are exiting the Noel Coward theatre, take a right, then another right, then one more right until you are at the back of the building. There’s a big sign that says “stage door” and there should be a barricade and a crowd of people in place. Jude Law wouldn’t take any pictures the night I went, but he signs everything he can, so buy a program and bring it! We didn’t have any problem getting his autograph, but you should still try to be towards the front of the crowd. He starts in the corner closest to the door, and I recommend waiting there. Good luck! 

chocolate-macarooon asked:

hi! me and my friend are going to be in london from the 1st-7th january, and we wanted to try our luck at standing tickets for Coriolanus! i know the box office opens at 10am but I was wondering how early to get there? thanks!

Sorry to reply to this so late, for some reason Tumblr didn’t tell me there was anything in my ask box! Rushing Coriolanus is pretty hardcore but definitely worth it! I got there at 5am on a Friday and by sheer luck managed to get the last standing ticket. Most of my friends camped out starting from 10pm the night before, and they managed to get return tickets for the stalls and had amazing seats. If you want to insure getting a ticket, I’d recommend camping out—but bring sleeping bags and tons of warm clothes, because it’s freezing!! Whatever time you arrive, hopefully the people before you will be able to tell you if there are any standing tickets left so you’ll know whether or not it’s worth staying. The other thing you can do is try for return tickets. I think I’ve seen people standing in the return ticket line starting from 10am. However, that option is a bit more of a risk. Let me know if there’s any other advice I can give you, and good luck! I hope you get a chance to see the show! 

SUNDAY 12.22

Woke up at 8:30am to receive the (rather alarming) breakfast the St. George Hotel supplies to its guests… packed and headed out! 

Closed my eyes, took a deep breath, and said goodbye to London. 

Heathrow express to the airport, reclaimed my luggage (ugh so expensive I am so sad), struggled through the bag drop line after a mishap with my boarding pass, stumbled through security where my bag was torn apart because I forgot to include my toothpaste in my bag of liquids (everything is terrible). Walked for a million years to get to the section of the airport United flies out of (which also has NO FOOD) and waited for my flight. Finally boarded and bunkered down for an 11.5 hour flight…yuck. 

And now I’m on my way back to California. My semester abroad has officially ended. I was sitting on the plane waiting for take off when all of a sudden my chest tightened and I felt so miserable and I thought, “What is happening?” And it took me a second to realize that the fact that I was leaving London was finally hitting me. 

This chapter in my life has ended. I’ve grown as a person by expanding my experiences. I’m so blessed and grateful to have had this time. I’m well aware of how lucky I am. I’m so thankful to my parents for paying for me to go abroad, for all the friends I have made, for everything I’ve seen and learned, for God’s love and comfort through it all.